Farmhouse Side Table Makeover

Farmhouse Side Table Makeover

If this little table could talk…

He’d tell you that he used to belong to someone who got sick of him and put him out to the side of the road to be taken away forever. Little did he know at that time, his life was only just beginning…

My mom found this table in the trash many years ago. THE. TRASH. Several weeks ago I was home for a visit and my mom asked if I would want to take something of hers to paint. I brought this sucker home with me and honestly, I was so inspired and anxious to get started that I completely forgot to take a “before” picture! The whole table was the same warm wood tone, and was in perfect condition, but just needed a little TLC.

Farmhouse side table makeover

Supplies:

  • Folk Art Home Decor chalk paint in Oatmeal
  • Folk Art Home Decor chalk paint in Sheepskin
  • Folk Art Home Decor chalk paint in Rich Black
  • Two inch angled Purdy brush
  • Chip brush
  • Coarse sandpaper
  • Minwax Paste Finishing Wax in Natural
  • Cheesecloth and/or lint-free rag

Directions:

I started out by cleaning the whole piece with a vinegar water spray (sprayed onto the rag, not directly onto the piece).

For the base, I created a “custom” color (quotes because that sounds so fancy when really it’s just mixing colors together until you find the shade you like most) by mixing Oatmeal and Sheepskin. I believe my mixture was about 3 parts Sheepskin to one part Oatmeal. Apply the first coat using the angled brush.

Once that is dry (usually by the time I finish the whole first coat, I wait a few minutes and then get started on the second), apply a second coat.

For the top, I wanted to add something interest to the existing wood finish so I dry brushed it with Rich Black using a chip brush. To dry brush, simply dip your paint brush lightly into the paint, then use a paper towel to dab off the excess paint so that hardly any remains on the brush. Then, using very light strokes, brush it onto the piece. You want your brush to just barely touch down when you brush it on. You can always add more paint, but removing paint if you’ve applied too much is a lot harder.

This table had an awesome lattice top, and I debated doing that in a different color but ultimately decided to stick with the black dry brushing here too. I’m glad I did!

Farmhouse table top

To finish it off, I lightly sanded the base with coarse grit sandpaper in the areas where wear and tear would naturally occur, mostly on the edges, corners, and those adorable legs on the edges where they stick out. I kept the distressing to a minimum.

Finally, I waxed the whole thing (base and top) with Minwax Paste Finishing Wax. I like to apply this using the suggestion on the can, which is to take a small amount between layers of cheesecloth so that just a small amount rubs through the cloth and onto the piece. However, you can also apply it with a clean rag. I think I like working with this wax for most pieces better than a softer wax that you apply with a brush. It only takes one coat and gives a really nice, “hard” finish.

Farmhouse side table

Basically, you just rub the wax on, and the wipe off any excess (wax on, wax off, people). But if you use the cheesecloth method it automatically applies just the right amount so that you barely have any excess to remove. You do, however, want to make sure you get any excess that may gather in the corners or little grooves. Once the excess wax is removed, you can use a clean lint-free cloth or a paper towel to buff. Get your elbow grease ready, because this can be quite the workout. The more you buff, the shinier your finish will be. I buffed this very lightly so it ended up with a nice, light sheen.

I’m so happy with how this turned out! I sent this little cutie back home today, and I hope he will be happy with his new look and enjoy his many remaining years!

Of course, Dani had to be involved in the photo shoot.

Farmhouse side table

 



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